Survey Reveals Discrimination Is Still a Major Issue in U.S. Workplaces

  1. Employment Law
  2. Survey Reveals Discrimination Is Still a Major Issue in U.S. Workplaces

The number of workplace discrimination complaints filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has been steadily declining over the last several years. This data suggests that employers are finally addressing issues related to discrimination and harassment in the workplace. But a new survey reveals that discrimination and harassment are still major problems in workplaces across the country.

Results of the Glassdoor Survey

Glassdoor, a job and recruiting website, recently surveyed over 1,100 workers in the U.S. as part of its 2019 Diversity and Inclusion Study. The results revealed that 61% of the workers surveyed had either witnessed or experienced workplace discrimination or harassment based on their age, race, gender, or sexual orientation.

Nearly half of the participants had witnessed or experienced age discrimination, 42% had witnessed or experienced racial discrimination, and another 42% had witnessed or experienced gender discrimination. One-third of the respondents had seen or experienced LGBTQ discrimination.

Who Feels the Most Discrimination?

The survey results also reveal which groups of workers are more likely to experience or notice discrimination in the workplace. Overall, younger workers between the ages of 18 and 34 were more likely to report that they had witnessed or experienced age, race, gender, or LGBTQ discrimination.

Female respondents were more likely to notice or experience discrimination or harassment based on gender or race, whereas male respondents were more likely to notice or experience age or LGBTQ discrimination.

How Does the U.S. Compare to Other Countries?

In addition to the U.S., Glassdoor also conducted this survey in the United Kingdom, France, and Germany. Based on the results, it’s clear that the U.S. is not the only country where discrimination and harassment occur. But the percentage of respondents that reported witnessing or experiencing any of the four categories of discrimination or harassment was highest in the U.S.

This could indicate that discrimination and harassment are more prevalent in the U.S. But it could also indicate that workers in the U.S. are more aware of these issues and thus more likely to report them. Either way, this survey shows that there is still a lot of work that needs to be done when it comes to ending discriminatory practices in the workplace.

Have you been discriminated against or harassed at work? If so, seek legal representation from the experienced attorneys at Armstrong & Vaught, P.L.C. right away. Our team will fight to protect your rights and recover compensation from your employer. Call us at (918) 582-2500 or toll-free at (800) 722-8880 or complete the simple form below for a free consultation with a skilled attorney.

Previous Post
Families First Coronavirus Response Act: What Are My Rights?
Next Post
Department of Labor’s New Joint Employer Rule Takes Effect in March
Menu