Age 18 Redeterminations and Supplemental Security Income (SSI)


Posted by: Chris

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a needs-based program that provides benefits to low income individuals with disabilities. Disabled people of all ages may qualify for these benefits, however the eligibility requirements are different for children and adults. As a result, if you receive SSI benefits as a child, the SSA will need to reassess your eligibility for the program once you turn 18. This assessment is often referred to as an “age 18 redetermination.” Here’s what you need to know about this process:

How the SSA Defines Disability For Children and Adults

Disabled children and adults must meet the SSA’s definition of disability in order to obtain SSI benefits. However, it’s important to note that the SSA defines disability differently for children and adults. Children are considered disabled if they have a mental or physical condition that meets all of the following conditions:

  • The condition results in marked and severe functional limitations.
  • The condition is expected to either result in death or last for a continuous period of at least one year.

On the other hand, adults are considered disabled if they have a mental or physical condition that meets these conditions:

  • The condition has made it impossible for you to work.
  • The condition is expected to either result in death or last for a continuous period of at least one year.

Because of these different definitions, it is possible that a child who receives SSI benefits will no longer be considered disabled once he is an adult.

Age 18 Redeterminations

The purpose of the age 18 redetermination is to determine if the child’s disability makes it impossible for him to work. If it does, this means he meets the SSA’s definition of disability for adults and can still receive benefits.

The SSA looks at a number of factors when making this decision. First, the SSA will review the child’s performance in school to look for signs that his disability could interfere with his ability to work. Next, the SSA will look at the child’s training, including volunteer work, internships, and extracurricular activities. This information will be used to determine what type of work the child is capable of performing as an adult. Finally, the SSA will consider how the child’s disability impacts their ability to handle stressful situations. After reviewing this information, the SSA will decide whether or not the child should continue receiving SSI benefits.

Children who are preparing for an age 18 determination can turn to the attorneys at Armstrong & Vaught, P.L.C. for help. Let our experienced attorneys work with the SSA to ensure they do not discontinue your benefits. Call us now at 918-582-2500, toll free at (800) 722-8880, or contact us online for a free consultation with a skilled attorney.